Pixelpancho – Androidèi @ Galleria Varsi

The human desire for immortality is reflected in the solo show Androidèi by Pixelpancho, on view at Galleria Varsi in Rome, Italy, through April 3rd, 2016. The exhibition stands as a metaphor of the ruins left behind by an ancient empire revived in the present to reveal the decay of the contemporary society, where Roman gods are replaced with machines, robot-like creatures perceived as a new form of divinity, that men both praise and fear: “Robots do not die; they are what stays on once we are all gone,” according to the artist.

In order to get closer to these rulers and entities and the deceiving promise of everlasting life, man undergoes a transformation, with the body turned into a hybrid which is reminiscent of human features and gestures, but also replicates the anatomy of the perfect machine. And it is interesting that the metamorphosis takes place in nature, which adds an organic feeling to the works, and at the same time highlights the contrast between man and robot, as well as the inevitable process of degradation in the cycle of life.

Instead of depicting a battlefield with the conquerors and defeated warriors, Pixelpancho chooses to portray the inner conflict, the overwhelming contradiction between what man wants and what he is able to achieve, and the obsession of eternal life on earth, afraid of an end which is not fully understood and, thus, not embraced by the people who rather prefer to rest their soul inside the iron skin, trapped in their own confusion and self-imposed limits.

Pixelpancho – Curazi II, acrylic on wood panel, 100 x 100 cm, 2016

‘Curazi II’, acrylic on wood panel, 100 x 100 cm, 2016

Pixelpancho – Mithra, acrylic on wood panel, 120 x 150 cm, 2016

‘Mithra’, acrylic on wood panel, 120 x 150  cm, 2016

Pixelpancho – Oblio, ink and watercolors on paper, 25 x 35 cm, 2016

‘Oblio’, ink and watercolors on paper, 25 x 35 cm, 2016

Pixelpancho – La seconda Fatica, Heliogravure (P3), Edition 5, 40×50 cm, Hahnemulhle 100% cotton – natural 350 gr, 2016

‘La seconda Fatica’, Heliogravure (P3), Edition 5, 40×50 cm, Hahnemulhle 100% cotton – natural 350 gr, 2016

Images via Galleria Varsi

Androidèi @ Galleria Varsi / Photo © BlindEyeFactory

Androidèi @ Galleria Varsi / Photo © BlindEyeFactory

Androidèi @ Galleria Varsi / Photo © BlindEyeFactory

Androidèi @ Galleria Varsi / Photo © BlindEyeFactory

Androidèi @ Galleria Varsi / Photo © BlindEyeFactory

Part of the exhibition, the artist also painted a mural in Rome:

Installation view photos and videos © BlindEyeFactory

 

About Pixelpancho

Pixelpancho was born in 1984 in Turin, where his grandfather, an amateur painter, introduced him to colour and form.

Pixelpancho’s passion for art and design led him to enrol in the Albertina Academy of Fine Arts in Turin, and then in the Academy of Fine Arts in Valencia, Spain, where he majored. During this period he became familiar with graffiti and street art and started using spray paint cans and markers on outdoor surfaces, quickly standing out from the classic paper and canvas media used by most other students. In his travels from his hometown of Turin to Valencia, Pixelpancho took every opportunity to make himself known on the streets. With the use of different mediums such as tile, wall painting and sticker/poster art, his work soon reached and decorated the walls of many European cities.

The time spent in Paris, Amsterdam, Warsaw, Vienna and other cities for graffiti jams and gallery exhibitions also allowed Pixelpancho’s style to evolve from the depiction of simple robot characters to the more complex compositions that characterize his art today.

The narrative in Pixelpancho‘s work is driven by a forgotten world sitting under a blanket of dust. In his universe, broken and dented robots are found decaying on the ground, their iron and rusted copper bodies falling and laying about as if discarded into oblivion. Although the scale of his work varies, his surreal realm is the constant thread that pierces through contemporary and historical references. The strength of the physical dimension and of the gestures that humanize his robots are particularly noticeable on the walls of abandoned buildings in cities throughout Europe, the U.S. and Mexico, and are all part of an interconnected structure of stories, as in all of his murals, paintings, and sculptures.

Pixelpancho - Father's love, London, 2015

‘Father’s love’, London, 2015

Pixelpancho & Evoca1, London, 2015

Collaboration with Evoca1 (featured), London, 2015

Pixelpancho & Vhils, Lisbon, 2014

Collaboration with Vhils (featured), Lisbon, 2013

Info and photos: Galleria Varsi

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More info about the artist on Behance, Facebook, Instagram and Flickr.

Find out more about Galleria Varsi on their website, on Facebook and Instagram.